alivechihiro:

things about capitalism people take for granted:

if you don’t prove your worth (and not to society at large, but specifically to the people who already have the money), you’ll literally fucking die. this is considered totally normal and not at all evidence that the system is evil

(via cellophane-queen)

clubjacobin:

tipsforradicals:

The more democratic a group or campaign is, the more effective it is, as all people involved can have an input and feel a part of the project.
Although often basic, this information is essential for the smooth-running of an organisation and sticking to these simple guidelines can make the difference between a long lasting successful group and a failure.
Below find tips on many aspects of organising, from facilitating meetings and financing your group, to structure and making decisions.
How to start a group
Basic principles of revolutionary organisation
Coming up with a strategy and set of principles
Decision making and organisational form
Financing a group
Handling difficult behaviour in meetings
How to organise and facilitate meetings effectively
Successful delegation guide
Taking meeting minutes guide
Building a solidarity network guide
Federations and networks guide

I didn’t read all of these so I don’t know how useful they all are, but there’s a shortage of good practical documents like these. Maybe they’ll help someone.
"

Saying things like “we’ve gone from white hoods to business suits” is one way to seem to speak to contemporary racism’s less vocal, yet still insidious nature. But it does a disservice to the public understanding of racism, and in the process undercuts the mission of drawing attention to contemporary racism’s severity.

It wasn’t the KKK that wrote the slave codes. It wasn’t the armed vigilantes who conceived of convict leasing, postemancipation. It wasn’t hooded men who purposefully left black people out of New Deal legislation. Redlining wasn’t conceived at a Klan meeting in rural Georgia. It wasn’t “the real racists” who bulldozed black communities in order to build America’s highway system. The Grand Wizard didn’t run COINTELPRO in order to dismantle the Black Panthers. The men who raped black women hired to clean their homes and care for their children didn’t hide their faces.

The ones in the hoods did commit violent acts of racist terrorism that shouldn’t be overlooked, but they weren’t alone. Everyday citizens participated in and attended lynchings as if they were state fairs, bringing their children and leaving with souvenirs. These spectacles, if not outright endorsed, were silently sanctioned by elected officials and respected members of the community.

It’s easy to focus on the most vicious and dramatic forms of racist violence faced by past generations as the site of “real” racism. If we do, we can also point out the perpetrators of that violence and rightly condemn them for their actions. But we can’t lose sight of the fact that those individuals alone didn’t write America’s racial codes. It’s much harder to talk about how that violence was only reinforcing the system of political, economic and cultural racism that made America possible. That history indicts far more people, both past and present.

"
The ‘Real Racists’ Have Always Worn Suits | The Nation (via so-treu)

(via fyeahcracker)

america-wakiewakie:

"This Nonviolent Stuff’ll Get You Killed: How Guns Made the Civil Rights Movement Possible" by Charles E. Cobb Jr. | AmazonVisiting Martin Luther King Jr. at the peak of the Montgomery, Alabama bus boycott, journalist William Worthy almost sat on a loaded pistol. “Just for selfdefense,” King assured him. It was not the only weapon King kept for such a purpose; one of his advisors remembered the reverend’s Montgomery, Alabama home as “an arsenal.”Like King, many ostensibly “nonviolent” civil rights activists embraced their constitutional right to selfprotection—yet this crucial dimension of the Afro-American freedom struggle has been long ignored by history. In This Nonviolent Stuff’ll Get You Killed, civil rights scholar Charles E. Cobb Jr. describes the vital role that armed self-defense played in the survival and liberation of black communities in America during the Southern Freedom Movement of the 1960s. In the Deep South, blacks often safeguarded themselves and their loved ones from white supremacist violence by bearing—and, when necessary, using—firearms. In much the same way, Cobb shows, nonviolent civil rights workers received critical support from black gun owners in the regions where they worked.Whether patrolling their neighborhoods, garrisoning their homes, or firing back at attackers, these courageous men and women and the weapons they carried were crucial to the movement’s success. Giving voice to the World War II veterans, rural activists, volunteer security guards, and self-defense groups who took up arms to defend their lives and liberties, This Nonviolent Stuff’ll Get You Killed lays bare the paradoxical relationship between the nonviolent civil rights struggle and the Second Amendment. Drawing on his firsthand experiences in the civil rights movement and interviews with fellow participants, Cobb provides a controversial examination of the crucial place of firearms in the fight for American freedom.
newwavefeminism:

qawiya:

wilsoncenter:

What do Rwanda, Afghanistan, and Iraq beat America at? Having women in congress/parliament
Countries with better representation of women in government than the United States (hat tip to our Women in Public Service Project):
Rwanda - 56%
Andorra - 50%
Cuba - 45%
Sweden - 45%
Seychelles - 44%
Senegal - 43%
Finland - 43%
South Africa - 42%
Nicaragua - 40%
Iceland - 40%
Norway - 40%
Mozambique - 39%
Denmark - 39%
Netherlands - 39%
Costa Rica - 39%
Timor-Leste - 39%
Belgium - 38%
Argentina - 37%
Mexico - 37%
Tanzania - 36%
Spain - 36%
Uganda - 35%
Angola - 34%
Serbia - 33%
Nepal - 33%
Germany - 33%
Macedonia - 33%
Ecuador - 32%
Slovenia - 32%
New Zealand - 32%
Algeria - 32%
Guyana - 31%
Burundi - 31%
Switzerland - 29%
Portugal - 29%
Trinidad and Tobago - 29%
Austria - 28%
Ethiopia - 28%
Afghanistan - 28%
France - 27%
Lesotho - 27%
Tunisia - 27%
Belarus - 27%
South Sudan - 27%
El Salvador - 26%
Bolivia - 25%
Iraq - 25%
Laos - 25%
Canada - 25%
Australia - 25%
Sudan - 25%
Lithuania - 25%
Vietnam - 24%
Namibia - 24%
Kazakhstan - 24%
Singapore - 24%
Liechtenstein - 24%
Croatia - 24%
Poland - 24%
Kyrgyzstan - 23%
Latvia - 23%
Bulgaria - 23%
Philippines - 23%
Pakistan - 23%
United Kingdom - 23%
Malawi - 22%
Mauritania - 22%
Czech Republic - 22%
Eritrea - 22%
Uzbekistan - 22%
Luxembourg - 22%
Peru - 22%
Italy - 21%
Boznia and Herzegovina - 21%
China - 21%
Greece - 21%
Cape Verde - 21%
Estonia - 21%
Dominican Republic - 21%
Cambodia - 20%
Israel - 20%
Moldova - 20%
Bangladesh - 20%
Honduras - 20%
Monaco - 19%
Tajikistan - 19%
Mauritius - 19%
Slovak Republic - 19%
Indonesia - 19%
Sao Tome and Principe - 18%
United States - 18%
(source: World Bank)

ayeee Iraq, we out here with our powerful women

Is it me, or does it feel like they use Afghanistan, Uganda, Pakistan and Iraq as deliberate foils to the United States? I get a “these backwards, hateful countries have more women in their senate and the US should be ashamed”
Like, yes we should obviously always be ashamed that we aren’t as progressive as we could be when it comes to equal representation. But I don’t feel comfortable with the idea that comparing us to countries in Africa and South Asia should further emphasize this shame.

My thoughts exactly. we believe ourselves to be a true 100% democracy when we really lack in a lot of areas when it comes to equality and representation. when other countries even show a hint of oppression, corruption, inequality etc. even countries experiencing revolution we tsk tsk and look down on them as if our country wasn’t founded on genocide, slavery and sexism.

kyssthis16:

negritaaa:

youngmarxist:

So if we have to show women what the baby looks like in their womb and tell them how the process works before allowing them to get an abortion, does that mean we should teach our soldiers about the culture of the lands we’re invading, and explain to them that the people we want them to kill have families and feel pain, just like Americans?

yooooooo

OOP!

(via newwavefeminism)

fuckallies:

On average, you have a 1 in 18,989 chance of being murdered

A trans person has a 1 in 12 chance of being murdered

The average life span of a cis person is about 75-90

The average life expectancy of a trans person is 23-30 years old

75% of people killed in anti LGBT hate crimes are poc

Think about this the next time you go crying over “cisphobia” and “reverse racism”

(via notnormaltapes)

k1mkardashian:

bodyfluids:

weirdtrip:

celebstarlets:

4/12/14 - Vanessa Hudgens at the 2014 Coachella Music Festival: Day 2.

what the entire fuck

OH MY GOD

gurl you in danger

I’m sure there aree plenty of dumbasses like that there.
"Rats and roaches live by competition under the law of supply and demand; it is the privilege of human beings to live under the laws of justice and mercy."
Wendell Berry (via azspot)

(via azspot)

nakedjupiter:

cantrelate:

vacuous-tart:

toughluvv:

toughluvv:

toughluvv:

MARGY PEPPER//RETROGRADE NIGHTMARE//CVNT PVNT
FUNDRAISER FOR THE TRANS WOMEN OF COLOUR NETWORK
WEDNESDAY APRIL 16TH @UNIT 2 - 163 Sterling Road - ALL AGES - WHEELCHAIR ACCESSIBLE DOORS 8PM (OVER BY MIDNIGHT SO SHELVE YR PUNK TIME AND PLEASE BE ON TIME) $5/PWYC/No one turned away for lack of $$ INVITE YR PALS.
PLEASE SPREAD W0RD! 
facebook event is here: https://www.facebook.com/events/695566890482161/

bumpin’ this cause it’s happening in four days!!

For those not on the facebook, please note:
doors are gonna be pushed back to 830 and here are rough set times for y’all!
Cunt Punt - 9:30 Retrograde Nightmare - 10:15 Margy Pepper - 11:00

See you Wednesday!


COME TO THIS, SUPPORT TWOC AND RAD BANDS AND RAD SPACES THAT ARE ACTUALLY WHEELCHAIR ACCESSIBLE.

Stoked!!

YAY !!!!